Real Fact About Diabetes Freedom Program

What would you do if you met a new person and the first thing they say is clearly a lie? You would probably run away. Well, pretty much the first thing Diabetes Freedom tells you is a lie: its creator George Reilly doesn't exist. Neither did the MD / professor who supposedly inspired

What would you do if you met a new person and the first thing they say is clearly a lie? You would probably run away. Well, pretty much the first thing Diabetes Freedom tells you is a lie: its creator George Reilly doesn't exist. Neither did the MD / professor who supposedly inspired it. Our advice: outliers!

Only the title of this recently published website should set off scam alerts, as it contains two words that scammers have been fond of over the centuries: "miracle" and "cure". Like so many of the diabetes scams that have gone viral on the internet, Diabetes Freedom claims to offer a way to lower blood sugar through a diet that stimulates the pancreas, increases brown fat, and keeps your blood sugar levels stable. Like other supposed cures, including Diabetes Destroyer and Diabetes Free, Diabetes Freedom sells questionable cures and exaggerated promises to lower your bank account, not your insulin levels.

Unfortunately, many of these websites are making things up. The big red flashing light that should be triggered by these Internet programs is that nowhere in the promotional materials mention the specifics of their "miracle cures". For example, the "cure" is touted to be used by a Dr. or Professor Freeman, but they don't give you any information about his credentials - mainly because he doesn't exist. Instead of providing information, they offer fear, especially that “Big Pharma” will block this information, thus playing into the consumer's fear of conspiracies (not that pharmaceutical companies are angels ...). After all, when you're trying to find a review for this miracle cure you will be beaten by fake review sites that are not independent or objective; They are just more marketers trying to take your money. You won't find the details as they are either simply repackaging the information available on the Internet or selling unscientific “theories” as real “cures”.

We see this type of scam all the time; It is almost a textbook-like program that internet marketers are overwhelming consumers with dubious information, much of which is available on the internet for free. The typical price these other scammers charge is $ 37. This is what Diabetes Freedom marketers want your credit card to be. We've done a little research on this particular diabetes regimen and here is what we found out.
So what are you getting for your $ 37?

What do you get for your hard-earned $ 37? First, it relies on a marketing strategy that involves an army of “marketing partners” who create fake review websites using terms like “scam,” “does it work,” and “verification” to attract unsuspecting consumers to believe that they are actually receiving objective information. Instead, they receive fake information for which the partners receive very lucrative commissions through Clickbank. And guess who pays for these commissions?


Henri Johnson

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